Archive for the 'standards' Category

Monday, December 31st, 2007

XPath puzzler: solution

Thanks to all the folks who showed interest in this little XPath puzzler published here a few weeks ago. Some asked to see the dataset, but I’m not able to release it at this time (but ask me again in 3 months).

Turns out it was a combination of two bugs, one mine, one somebody else’s. Careful observers noted that I wasn’t using any namespace prefixes in the XPath, and since I did specify that it was XPath 1.0, that technically rules out XHTML as the source language. Like nearly all XML I work with these days, the first thing I do is strip off the namespaces to make it easier to work with. Bug #1 was that in a few cases, the namespaces didn’t get stripped.

Bug #2 was in the XPath engine itself. Which one? Uh, whatever one ships with the “XPath” plugin for JEdit. It’s hard to tell directly, but I think it might be an older version of Xalan-J. In the case of the expression //meta, it properly located only those elements part of no namespace. But in the case of //meta/@property, it was including all the nodes that would have been selected by //*[local-name(.)='meta']/@property. Hence, a larger number of returned nodes.

Confusing? You bet!  -m

P.S. WebPath would not have this problem, since in the default mode it matches local-names only to begin with.

Friday, December 21st, 2007

XML 2007 buzz: XForms 1.1

One whole evening of the program was devoted to XForms, focused around the new 1.1 Candidate Recommendation. I admit that some of the early 1.1 drafts gave me pause, but these guys did a good job cleaning up some of the dim corners and adding the right features in the right places. This is worth a careful look. -m

Friday, December 21st, 2007

XML 2007 buzz: Hadoop

OK, the majority of the buzz came from my talk, where I strongly encouraged folks to take a look at Hadoop. This article seems to be saying much the same things. If you’re curious about the future of distributed computation and storage, it’s worth a look. -m

Sunday, December 16th, 2007

Slides from XML 2007: WebPath: Querying the Web as XML

Here’s the slides from my presentation at XML 2007, dealing with an implementation of XPath 2.0 in Python. I hope to have even more news in this area soon.

WebPath (html)

WebPath (OpenDocument, 4.7 megs)

Did you notice the OpenOffice has nice slide export, that generates both graphically-accurate slides and highly indexable and accessible text versons? -m

Saturday, December 15th, 2007

XPath puzzler

While I’ve got your attention, here’s an XPath (1.0) puzzler. I have an RDFa dataset compiled from various and sundry sources. It’s all wrapped up in a single XML file. I run this XPath to see how many meta elements are present: //meta and it returns a node-set of size 762. Now, I want to see how many property elements are present, so I run the query: //meta/@property and it returns a node-set of size 764. How is it that the second node-set can be bigger than the first? -m

Saturday, December 15th, 2007

XML spell check

Surely somebody has implemented this in at least one tool.

In a text editor, I come across a misspelled close tag like </xsl:stylsheet>. My editor highlights the line as an error, which is is, not matching the start tag and all. Why can’t it go the extra step and give me the same kind of interface as I get for misspelled words, which an easy option to repair the spelling? This seems like a much simpler problem than all the hairy cases around human-language spell check…

So, what tools already do this today? -m

Thursday, December 6th, 2007

Lists in RDFa?

I came away from the XML 2007 conference with lots of new ideas and inspirations. I’ll write some postings about individual technologies in the coming days.

But for now, another RDFa question. If I need to represent a list, what is the best way to do it? Does it differ between ordered and unordered lists? Let’s take some concrete examples, say a shopping list and an (ordered) todo list. How would you do it? -m

P.S. What about multi-level lists?

Thursday, November 29th, 2007

XPath 2.0 implementation details

Well, my plans for a series of postings about details of implementing XPath 2.0 fell rather short, so let’s skip straight to the good stuff.

An article by Mike Kay giving the details of the Saxon architecture. On the surface it’s about performance, but it also has an excellent section in internals. Worth a look. This has been quite influential for me, and maybe you too. -m

Tuesday, November 13th, 2007

Representing structured data on a web page

OK, let me take a step back from specific technologies like RDFa, let’s go through a really simple example.

On a certain web page, I refer to a book. That book has a price of 21.86 US dollars. The page is intended as primarily human-readable, but I want to include machine-readable data too, for a global audience.
What would you do? What specific markup choices would you make? What specific markup would you use? -m

Saturday, November 10th, 2007

RDFa question

What is the difference between placing instanceof=”prefix:val” vs. rel=”prefix:val” on something? How do I decide between the two?

In the example of hEvent data, why is it better/more accurate to use instanceof=”cal:Vevent” instead of a blank node via rel=”cal:Vevent”?

-m

Monday, November 5th, 2007

A better name for CURIEs (?)

“Compact Clark Notation“. (Inspired by reading this) -m

Monday, October 29th, 2007

Five percent rules

Many things in life are simpler when you only need to be within 5%:

  • Pi is pretty much 3
  • Water weighs pretty much 8 pounds a gallon
  • A quart is pretty much a liter (and a gallon, 4 liters)
  • A year has pretty much 360 days, and pretty much 31 million seconds
  • The speed of light is pretty much 300,000 km/s, which is pretty much one foot/nanosecond

Of course, there’s even more things that get more convenient when you have 10% or 20% to work with… -m

Monday, October 22nd, 2007

Is there fertile ground between RDFa and GRDDL?

The more I look at RDFa, the more I like it. But still it doesn’t help with the pain-point of namespaces, specifically of unmemorable URLs all over the place and qnames (or CURIEs) in content.

Does GRDDL offer a way out? Could, for instance, the namespace name for Dublin Core metadata be assigned to the prefix “dc:” in an external file, linked via transformation to the document in question? Then it would be simpler, from a producer or consumer viewpoint, to simply use names like “dc:title” with no problems or ambiguity.

This could be especially useful not that discussions are reopening around XML in HTML.

As usual, comments welcome. -m

Saturday, October 20th, 2007

Building a tokenizer for XPath or XQuery

In researching for an XPath 2.0 implementation, I ran across this curious document from the W3C. Despite being labeled a Working Draft (as opposed to a Note), it appears to be a one-shot document with no future hope for updates or enhancements.

In short, it outlines several options for the first stage or two of an XPath 2.0 or XQuery implementation. (Despite the title, it talks about more than just a tokenizer; additionally a parser and a possible intermediate stage). Tokenizing and parsing XPath are significantly more difficult than other languages, because things like this are perfectly legitimate (if useless):

if(if) then then else else- +-++-**-* instance
of element(*)* * * **---++div- div -div

The document tries to standardize on some terminology for various approaches toward dealing with XPath. The remaining bulk of the document sketches out some lexical states that would be useful for one particular implementation approach. I guess the vibrant, thriving throngs of XPath 2.0 developers didn’t see the need for this kind of assistance.

In short, I didn’t find it terribly useful. Maybe some readers have, though. Feel free to comment below. Subsequent articles here will describe how I approached the problem. Stay sharp! -m

Monday, October 15th, 2007

XForms evening at XML 2007

Depending on who’s asking and who’s answering, W3C technologies take 5 to 10 years to get a strong foothold. Well, we’re now in the home stretch for the 5th anniversary of XForms Essentials, which was published in 2003. In past conferences, XForms coverage has been maybe a low-key tutorial, a few day sessions, and hallway conversation. I’m pleased to see it reach new heights this year.

XForms evening is on Monday December 3 at the XML 2007 conference, and runs from 7:30 until 9:00 plus however ERH takes on his keynote. :) The scheduled talks are shorter and punchier, and feature a lot of familiar faces, and a few new ones (at least to me). I’m looking forward to it–see you there! -m

Monday, October 8th, 2007

XML 2007 Schedule

As widely reported by now, the final schedule for XML 2007 this December in Boston is up. All I have to add is the suggestion of careful attention to the Tuesday program at 4:00. :) If you can’t wait, some technical details are forthcoming in this space. That is all. -m

Friday, October 5th, 2007

Playing with microformats

I’ll be doing some experimenting around here over maybe the next week or two. Specifically, setting up hAtom within these pages. Watch for falling debris and report any unusual observations. -m

Wednesday, October 3rd, 2007

XML Annoyance: do greater-than signs need to be escaped?

Let’s see how many downstream pieces of software trip over this post…

Do greater-than and less-than signs need to be escaped in XML? Conventional wisdom has it that less-than signs always do, since that character starts a fresh “tag”, but greater-than signs are safe.

Wrong.

There is a particular sequence, namely ]]> , not allowed to occur unescaped in XML “for compatibility“–a particular phrase the spec uses to indicate rules that only an SGML-head could love (but still strict requirements nonetheless). Does your software prevent this condition from causing an error? -m

Monday, October 1st, 2007

simple parsing of space-seprated attributes in XPath/XSLT

It’s a common need to parse space-separated attribute values from XPath/XSLT 1.0, usually @class or @rel. One common (but incorrect) technique is simple equality test, as in {@class=”vcard”}. This is wrong, since the value can still match and still have other literal values, like “foo vcard” or “vcard foo” or ” foo vcard bar “.

The proper way is to look at individual tokens in the attribute value. On first glance, this might require a call to EXSLT or some complex tokenization routine, but there’s a simpler way. I first discovered this on the microformats wiki, and only cleaned up the technique a tiny bit.

The solution involves three XPath 1.0 functions, contains(), concat() to join together string fragments, and normalize-space() to strip off leading and trailing spaces and convert any other sequences of whitespace into a single space.

In english, you

  • normalize the class attribute value, then
  • concatenate spaces front and back, then
  • test whether the resulting string contains your searched-for value with spaces concatenated front and back (e.g. ” vcard “

Or {contains(concat(‘ ‘,normalize-space(@class),’ ‘),’ vcard ‘)} A moment’s thought shows that this works well on all the different examples shown above, and is perhaps even less involved than resorting to extension functions that return nodes that require further processing/looping. It would be interesting to compare performance as well…

So next time you need to match class or rel values, give it a shot. Let me know how it works for you, or if you have any further improvements. -m

Thursday, September 27th, 2007

XForms Editors?

What are some good tools, with a strong preference for open source, for editing XForms these days? Comment below… -m

Friday, September 21st, 2007

Come see me at XML 2007

Watch this space for details. I’ll be speaking about something related to Python and XPath 2.0. Watch this blog for tidbits on the subject. :) -m

Saturday, September 8th, 2007

Steven Pemberton and Michael(tm) Smith on (X)HTML, XForms, mobile, etc.

Video from XTech, worth a look. -m

Friday, September 7th, 2007

Time to update the XForms Validator (XFV)?

In the last couple of days, I’ve had three completely separate instances of people freshly interested in XForms coming to ask me about Stuff.

A declarative model is pretty much irresistible compared to the alternatives. But nobody can directly use an abstract declarative sculpture–sombody needs to put some solid vocabulary and processing meat on the skeleton. And, of course, a good example of that is XForms.

Around the time the book came out, I put together a modest XForms Validator, modeled after the W3C validator of the time. It later went open source, and is available online. But compared to the latest in online validator technology, it feels more than a little dated.

Hypothetically speaking, if I actually had free time, would it make sense to update the XForms Validator? What would you use it for? Would you be willing to help?

Comments below. Thanks, -m

Wednesday, August 29th, 2007

2 years at Yahoo!

Today is my 2nd anniversary at Yahoo!. Looking back, it’s been a great time. Since I don’t know how long ago, I’ve fantasized about being involved in research. Check. Since sitting across from the mobile guys for 5 years in W3C meetings, I’ve fantasized about working in mobile. Check. And since I wrote Web search, without the web (demo), I’ve fantasized about working on web-scale search.

Check.

What will the next two years bring? I don’t know, but I’m certain they will be even better than the previous two. -m

Thursday, August 16th, 2007

XForms Essentials at…Target?

Yeah, it’s for real. You save 27%! Sure, it’s powered by Amazon, but it’s still a little weird to see this come up in search results… -m

Wednesday, August 8th, 2007

New W3C Validator

Go check it out. It even has a Tidy option to clean up the markup. But they missed an important feature: it should include an option to run Tidy on the markup first then validate. This is becoming the defacto bar for web page validity anyway… -m

Sunday, June 24th, 2007

At that moment, I knew my business was Machine Ready

I fell asleep one night while reading Ray Kurzweil, and had this crazy dream where the internet called me up (over VOIP, naturally) to complain that none of my web pages made sense. Par for the course, I thought at first. But then I told the internet a few things, to let me worry about my own domain of concern; he/she/it grappled with a response when a loud noise awoke me–my chirping alarm clock. I reached over to pound the Snooze button, but I stopped when my eyes focused on the display, which read in segmented LED letters: I rtFm. -m

Monday, April 30th, 2007

Why does ‘rich client’ equal ‘bad separation of presentation from content’?

I started writing this post back when doing tech editing the “Rich Client Alternatives” chapter on Web 2.0, the book. Now, with Apollo getting some attention, it’s worth revisiting.

What do XUL, Yahoo! Widgets, OpenLaszlo, Silverlight, and Apollo have in common? All of them mix content with presentation to some degree. Years of experience on the web have shown that a properly-done CSS layout gives you:

  • smaller, faster pages
  • better accessibility and user control of rendering
  • better adaptation to different screen resolutions
  • easier repurposing of data, including microformats
  • better mobile compatibility

Initial HTML browsers didn’t have these advantages, and gave in to early pressure to implement things like blink and font tags. Today, most webfolks would admit that these presentational tags were a mistake, and contemporary web design avoids them.
So what is it about “rich” clients that’s different? Are developers missing out on the hard lessons learned on the web? Or is there something inherent in the definition of “rich clients” that changes the balance? Your comments are welcome. -m

Wednesday, April 11th, 2007

James Clark blog: do you read the web or feed version?

James Clark is blogging. A few zillion people have already mentioned this.

A slightly tangent observation: I had trouble reading through an entire article in web form, but had no problems returning later to the atom feed. At first I chalked it up to early morning grogginess, but it seems to be a repeatable phenomenon at all hours, at least for me.

So a double thanks to James for publishing a full feed.

How about you: do you have an easier time reading long form articles in a feed reader vs. a browser?  Do you prefer feed reader vs. browser for this blog? Comment below. -m

Sunday, April 1st, 2007

HTTPoetry

I can’t talk on the phone right now. Can you follow up on email?
Consider it placed on my todo list.
Let me give you my new address.
Hmm, I don’t have it.
What are you talking about?

(If you get the pattern, post below…) -m